Miraculous and Mystical Cape Planka

Two kilometres south-east from Rogoznica there is a Cape Planka which is the most outstretched part of the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea, and it is a geographical and climate divider of the north and south Adriatic. It is a place of strong north and south collision of wind, cyclones and anticyclones, and sea currents. The largest waves of the Adriatic Sea crash there and on the other hand the sea is as calm as you could possibly imagine. It all creates a stunning natural spectacle which noone should miss because you can neither see nor experience similar things anywhere in the world.
This cape dramatically affects the weather conditions in Dalmatia, especially in Rogoznica where, because of its impact during the three summer months, the rainfall is only 60 mm/month, almost three times less than in the neighbouring cities of Split and Šibenik.
Cape Planka and its mood was first mentioned in the oldest preserved descriptions of the eastern Adriatic coast. It was known to Greek sailors under the name of Diomede’s Cape in the 6th century BC. Homerus in his work ‘Iliad’ reveals that after the Trojan war Diomedes himself, who was one of the greatest heroes of Greek mythology, sailed around it, and Timaeus, a Greek historian, already in 4 century BC described the unusual natural anomaly which it causes. His description of weather conditions over the Diomede’s Cape belongs to the oldest descriptions of a meteorology phenomena in the European culture. Also a Greek scholar, geographer, astronomer and mathematician Eratosthenes wrote about Diomede’s Cape in the 3rd century BC, an important epic poem about the Argonauts took place there, and in the 1st century it was mentioned by Pliny the Elder in ‘Natualis Historia’, the first encyclopedic work of European culture.
One of the miracles attributed to the Christian saint John, the bishop of Trogir from the 11th century is related to Cape Planka. According to the legend, after the shipwreck by Cape Planka he walked on the waves and saved the lives of King Coleman and all the sailors. In memory of him and his miracles, at this place a votive church was built in 1324.

The Church of St. John, a protected site of national religious heritage, is located on Cape Planka in a rugged desert landscape. The church is oriented east-west, and is rectangular in shape with a semicircular apse. The church bears the Gothic feature of the pointed arch and the Romanesque feature of the massive flange, and an even older pre-Romanesque tradition is evident in the division of the interior walls with shallow arches between the pilaster strips. Solid in shape, its thick walls were built on whenever it was possible. Though the church is more than 10 meters from the sea, waves carrying destructive salt still manage to reach it. Over time, they’ve encircled the church with jagged rocks that now form part of the overall structure.